Alumni Update: Dr. Glen Goodman (PhD, 2015) Wins Fulbright and German Academic Exchange Service Grants

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The History Department sends its congratulations to Emory alumnus Glen Goodman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Goodman won a Fulbright grant to teach in the graduate program in History at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, located in Porto Alegre, during the spring semester 2018. In addition, the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) awarded Goodman a research grant to conduct archival work in Berlin during the summer of 2017. Goodman was an advisee of Dr. Jeffrey Lesser, Department Chair and Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History.

History Honors Students McGlade and Perlman Receive FCHI Fellowships

Congratulations to History Honors students Hugh McGlade and Samantha Perlman, who have received Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry (FCHI) Undergraduate Humanities Honors Fellowships for Spring 2017. The fellowship receives support from the Emory College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program and aids students completing honors projects for one semester. Along with office space at the FCHI and fellowship resources, recipients participate in a dynamic community of cross-generational scholars. Learn more about the FCHI fellowships and check out the brief profiles of McGlade and Perlman below.

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Hugh McGlade is majoring in History and International Studies. He focuses on Latin America, especially Brazil, and is a student of Portuguese. His thesis investigates a hunger alleviation program in Brazil during the early 1940s, exploring questions of capitalism, politics, and cultural exchange.
 
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Samantha Perlman is double majoring in History and African American Studies. Her honors thesis stems from her experience witnessing student protest movements while abroad in South Africa, as well as her interest in American educational reform. Her thesis examines the history of affirmative action at Emory College from 1969 to 1989.  By uncovering the story of affirmative action at Emory, her project provides historical context for how Emory can address systemic problems of underrepresentation and promote a more inclusive campus climate.

Dr. Mark Ravina Awarded Japan Foundation Grant for Summer 2017 Workshop

Dr. Mark Ravina, Professor of History, has been awarded a Japan Foundation Grant to host a summer 2017 (May 30 to June 2) workshop, “Japanese Language Text Mining: Digital Methods for Japanese Studies.” The workshop will bring together researchers working across the fields of computational text analysis and Japanese Studies, and will focus on the unique challenges of the digital analysis of Japanese texts. The workshop is part of a collaboration with Hoyt Long (The University of Chicago) and Molly Des Jardin (The University of Pennsylvania) on Japanese text mining. Check out the call for proposals.

Graduating History Major Takuya Maeda Profiled for Innovative Scholarship

In May of 2016 senior Takuya Maeda will graduate with highest honors in history. Maeda was recently profiled for his research accomplishments at Emory, most especially his work on the use of funds from the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 “set aside for the Japanese-American community to develop educational efforts and awareness about internment” during World War II. Maeda received a grant from the Scholarly Inquiry and Research at Emory (SIRE) program to conduct this research, which his mentor Professor Daniel LaChance described as “groundbreaking.” Maeda plans to continue and expand this project through graduate work in history. Read the full profile on Takuya here.

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Slave Voyages, through a Digital Lens: Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database Receives Recognition and Support

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade database, accessible at slavevoyages.com, received a Digital Humanities Implementation grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) this year. The international project is lead by Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History Emeritus David Eltis, who teamed up with co-editors at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship to enhance the website through funds provided by the NEH. The Voyages project was recently featured on the news page for the Office of the Provost at Emory. You can read the full article here or by clicking on the image below.

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David Eltis and Allen Tullos Win NEH Digital Humanities Implementation Grant

Drs. David Eltis and Allen Tullos recently won a Digital Humanities Implementation Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The NEH program “is designed to fund the implementation of innovative digital-humanities projects that have successfully completed a start-up phase and demonstrated their value to the field. Such projects might enhance our understanding of central problems in the humanities, raise new questions in the humanities, or develop new digital applications and approaches for use in the humanities.” Drs. Eltis and Tullos applied for funds to enhance the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (also known as slavevoyages.org) by adding additional records about the intra-American movement of enslaved persons and to recode the underlying database to allow for long term sustainability.

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