Dr. Ernest Freeberg (Ph.D., 1995) to Present at National Archives at Atlanta

Ph.D. alumnus Ernest Freeberg (1995) will return to Atlanta on September 16 to present at a symposium, The Great War Over Here: Stories from the Home Front, held at the National Archives at Atlanta. Freeberg is Department Head and Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the author of Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent (Harvard UP, 2010). View more details about the event here.

Dr. Kristin Mann Wins Distinguished Scholar Award

Congratulations to Dr. Kristin Mann, Professor of History, for winning the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Lagos Studies Association. Mann’s book publications about Lagos include  Marrying Well: Marriage, Status and Social Change among the Educated Elite in Colonial Lagos (Cambridge UP, 1985) and Slavery and the Birth of an African History: Lagos, 1760-1900 (Indiana UP, 2007). Read a more complete description of Mann’s scholarship and service to the discipline, written by Dr. Jessica Reuther (Ph.D., 2016), here.

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Courses Taught by Crespino and Sasson Highlighted by Emory News Center

Two History Department courses made the list of 19 notable offerings for Emory’s undergraduates this fall. Professor Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of American History, will teach a seminar course titled “Atticus Finch and American History.” Professor Tehlia Sasson, Assistant Professor of History, is offering “Origins of Human Rights.” Read the course descriptions below, and check out other compelling fall 2017 offerings around campus here.

Atticus Finch and American History

“Since its publication in 1960, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird has been one of the most widely read books in the world. The recent publication of Lee’s apprentice novel, Go Set A Watchman has renewed interest in the figure of Atticus Finch and the historical and cultural sources that influenced Lee. This seminar examines the history of the American South in the Jim Crow era that prefigured both the idealized Atticus of Mockingbird and the reactionary Atticus of Watchman. The class will analyze the political uses to which this character has been put since Mockingbird’s publication.”

Origins of Human Rights 

“This course recovers the multiple histories of human rights from their deep origins in the 1750s to their more recent formations in the 1990s. It focuses on the history of Europe and its engagement with the wider world: looking at how Europe has shaped and was shaped by Africa, South Asia and the United States over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. The goal will be to analyze how the evolution of human rights became part of our contemporary framework of politics, law and culture.”

 

 

Daniel LaChance on GPB: ‘How Americans Change Their Tune On The Death Penalty’

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Assistant Professor of History Daniel LaChance recently appeared on Georgia Public Broadcasting’s show On Second Thought to discuss changing perceptions among the U.S. populace about capital punishment. LaChance published his first book,  Executing Freedom: The Cultural Life of Capital Punishment in the United States, last year with the University of Chicago Press. Listen to the full interview here.

Alumni Update: Christina Hansen (’02C)

The New York Times goes live from the hack stand…

How do you combine a love of history with your love of horses? Emory History Honors alumna Christina Hansen (’02C) grew up in Lexington, KY. She is a co-founder of Blue Star Equiculture @equiculture, a sanctuary for retired working horses in Palmer, Massachusetts.  Blue Star visits local fairs, schools, and farm markets and gives presentations explaining how “History is Written in Hooves.” Through its partnership with the Stockbridge School of Agriculture at the University of Massachusetts, Blue Star shows future vets and farmers how to care for draft horses.  It runs workshops on equine first aid and pasture management, for instance, and leads eco-tours.  The Sanctuary works with military veterans, seniors, Girl and Boy Scout clubs, and 4-H groups.  If you are in the area, you might like to know that every Saturday Blue Star offers wagon rides at the Sanctuary.  (And if you are looking for a horse, Blue Star runs an adoption program.)

Christina began her career as a horse advocate and carriage driver in historic Philadelphia. She answered an ad that asked, “Do you love horses? Do you love history? Do we have a job for you!” Since her move to NYC 5 years ago, she has become a prominent and active spokesperson for the city’s carriage horses, as well as driving a vintage carriage.  She has appeared often on television and in print media.  In these two New York Times live interviews from the spring of 2017, Christina discusses the history of horses in the city, the regulations that protect them (some of the most comprehensive equine ordinances in the country), and even the nineteenth-century carriage she drives.  The interviews with NYT reporter Masha Goncharova also feature her horses, King and Hoffa. The first live interview was so popular that the NYT made a return visit.  You can follow her on Twitter @carriagecavalry and/or @NYCHorses and on the website she created “Carriage On.” If you look around the website, you also will find tours of their stables. If you are interested, check out the video “Save NYC Horse Carriages,” narrated by Liam Neeson. #CarriageOn  http://carriageon.com/nytlive/