Join us for First ‘History Pathways’ Event: “Getting the Most Out of Your Emory History Major”

Join us for our first History Pathways event, “Getting the Most Out of Your Emory History Major,” on Wednesday, October 2, from 12:30-1:30pm in Bowden Hall 323. The event is open to all students – from first year through seniors – who want to learn more about Emory’s History Department. The event will include pizza and soft drinks, and we will cover the many exciting opportunities we offer for undergraduates, such as Cuttino Fellowships and Clio Paper Prizes. We will also launch our “History Pathways” program, aimed at developing career mentoring and internship programs. If you plan to attend, please respond to the poll here. Reach out to Professor Judith A. Miller (histjam@emory.edu) with any questions. 71478852_1343103635864184_8628822273870004224_n.png

Atlanta Native and History Major Hallie Lonial Interns at Atlanta History Center

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Lonial in Atlanta History Center Archives

This semester History major Hallie Lonial is interning in the manuscript archives at the Atlanta History Center. An Atlanta native, Hallie visited the AHC on a field trip with her high school. The internship allows her to pursue her general interest in history while learning more about her hometown. Why would someone belonging to “generation online” want to work with old manuscripts? Hallie has the perfect answer: “I wanted to work with manuscripts because I’m really fascinated by what people say when they think nobody will ever read it.” During her work, she handles papers from or about famous people like Ivan Allen Jr. and well-known places like the Atlanta-Fulton County stadium. She also processes personal diaries, business ledgers, letters, and scrapbooks that tell of ordinary people’s lives. “I’ve learned that history is important to everyone, belongs to everyone, and is created by everyone, not just those we most commonly think of.” Learn more about resources for internships for Emory undergraduates here: http://history.emory.edu/home/undergraduate/resources/internships.html.

History Majors Ellie Coe and Hannah Fuller Win Woodruff Library’s Elizabeth Long Atwood Undergraduate Research Award

History Majors Ellie Coe and Hannah Fuller have each won Elizabeth Long Atwood Undergraduate Research Awards from Emory’s Woodruff Library. The Atwood Award recognizes the best paper that makes use of the library’s resources and applies research skills and critical analysis to evidence. Coe’s piece is titled “The Soldier’s Queue in the Eighteenth Century,” and she wrote the paper in Prof. Judith A. Miller’s course “The Origins of Capitalism” (Fall 2018). Fuller conducted the research for her paper, “Jemima Wilkinson: The Genderless Feminist of the Enlightenment,” in Prof. Judith A. Miller’s course “HIST 385W: Scandalous Texts in the Enlightenment” (Spring 2018). Learn more about the awards here: http://web.library.emory.edu/research-learning/award-research-programs/undergraduate-research-award.html.

 

History Honors Student and Undergraduate Fox Center Fellow Yi Xie (19C) Reflects on Research

Senior History Honors student Yi Xie is currently working on her thesis as an undergraduate fellow at the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Xie’s thesis is titled “Becoming American in a Multiracial Context: Chinese ‘Sojourners’ and African Americans’ Battle for Inclusion in a White Republic, 1868-1904.” She recently wrote a reflection, “Becoming American: A Historical Parallel between Chinese Immigrants and African Americans, 1868-1904,” about her research and experiences at the Fox Center. Read the full post here along with an excerpt from the abstract of her project below.

“This research aims to develop a clear understanding of the racial dynamics of the second half of the nineteenth century by studying the ‘Chinese Question,’ the ‘Negro Problem,’ and the relations between the two from the perspectives of abolitionists, Caucasian immigrants, African Americans, and the Chinese. She investigates why and how the ‘Chinese Question’ and the ‘Negro Problem’ were conflated and differentiated, and how dynamic and complex were the relations between the two. She also conducts a comparative study of anti-black and anti-Chinese violence on the West Coast. She has visited archives in Northampton, MA and will conduct more archival research in Seattle, WA.”

‘HowStuffWorks’ Features Crespino’s ‘History 385: Right-Wing America’

This spring Jimmy Carter Professor of History and Department Chair Joseph Crespino is teaching a 385 course titled “Right-Wing America.” HowStuffWorks contributing writer John Donovan recently featured Crespino’s course in the article “Bridging the Chasm: Emory Class Delves Into America’s Right-wing History.” HowStuffWorks editorial board describes the website as a “source for unbiased, reliable, easy-to-understand answers and explanations of how the world actually works.” Read the full article here and check out Donovan’s observations from the first day of the spring course below.

“‘Donald Trump really defied what we thought we knew about American politics,’ Crespino tells his class that first day. ‘Trump’s election not only kind of upended what we thought were these iron laws of American politics’ — mainly, that candidates have to run toward the center to get elected — ‘but it also makes the American past look a lot different, you know? Things that we used to take for granted as kind of hiccups along the way all of a sudden look more important. And they look more ominous. And we begin to see that they weren’t just hiccups, but they’re kind of a recurring pattern.’

That pattern is what interests scholars. It’s what Crespino hopes his students will grasp, too; that the ideas and beliefs that drive right-wing America today didn’t begin with Trump. And they won’t disappear when he does, either.”

History Major John Priddy Named Bobby Jones Scholar

Congratulations to John Priddy, a senior History and Political Science double major, for being selected as one of four students to receive Emory’s prestigious Robert T. Jones Jr. Scholarship. Active since 1976, the program supports a year of study at the University of St Andrews in Scotland for students who exhibit academic excellence, character, and integrity. Priddy’s academic and policy interests center on the criminal justice system, particularly the factors that shape public opinion about solitary confinement. Read more about Priddy’s extensive leadership on Emory’s campus as well as this years other Bobby Jones Scholars: “Outstanding students chosen as Bobby Jones Scholars for study in Scotland.”