Courses Taught by Crespino and Sasson Highlighted by Emory News Center

Two History Department courses made the list of 19 notable offerings for Emory’s undergraduates this fall. Professor Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of American History, will teach a seminar course titled “Atticus Finch and American History.” Professor Tehlia Sasson, Assistant Professor of History, is offering “Origins of Human Rights.” Read the course descriptions below, and check out other compelling fall 2017 offerings around campus here.

Atticus Finch and American History

“Since its publication in 1960, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird has been one of the most widely read books in the world. The recent publication of Lee’s apprentice novel, Go Set A Watchman has renewed interest in the figure of Atticus Finch and the historical and cultural sources that influenced Lee. This seminar examines the history of the American South in the Jim Crow era that prefigured both the idealized Atticus of Mockingbird and the reactionary Atticus of Watchman. The class will analyze the political uses to which this character has been put since Mockingbird’s publication.”

Origins of Human Rights 

“This course recovers the multiple histories of human rights from their deep origins in the 1750s to their more recent formations in the 1990s. It focuses on the history of Europe and its engagement with the wider world: looking at how Europe has shaped and was shaped by Africa, South Asia and the United States over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. The goal will be to analyze how the evolution of human rights became part of our contemporary framework of politics, law and culture.”

 

 

Eckert, Payne, and Undergraduates Explore Roots of Contemporary Conflict in “History of Now”

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The Emory News Center recently published a profile on the spring 2017 course “History of Now,” taught by Drs. Astrid M. Eckert and Matthew Payne. The co-taught class is structured around the examination of contemporary events — ranging from Russian presidential politics to Brexit — in historical context. Pitched an introductory level, the course has drawn an array of students across disciplines and year from Emory’s College of Arts and Sciences. Read the full Emory News Center article (“‘History of Now’ helps students understand roots of current conflicts”) and check out the course description below.

The course covers European history from the devastation of World War II to Europe’s current predicaments, such as the Ukrainian crisis, the Brexit decision, and refugee movements. Team-taught by specialists on German and Russian history, the course takes an expansive view of what constitutes Europe and considers select topics in European postwar history such as postwar affluence, détente, war memories, environmental challenges, and others, from western, central and eastern European perspectives. It traces how experiences of the war years rippled through postwar Europe, merged with Cold War exigencies, and reverberated in new ways after the fall of Communism. The course offers students not only an overview of postwar European history but also introduces them to ways of analysing current events in regard to their deep roots in the continent’s past.

Senior Hugh McGlade Wins Fulbright Research Grant

Congratulations to senior History major Hugh McGlade, who received a grant from the U.S. State Department’s Fulbright program for research in Brazil. The grant provides funding for one year of academic study and research. McGlade will live in Rio de Janeiro for nine months and enroll as a graduate student at the Fundação Getúlio Vargas. In parallel, he will expand his research on U.S.-Brazilian hunger alleviation programs in the 1940s, a subject he previously studied in his honors thesis. Read an excerpt of McGlade’s project description below:

“My research project would examine a hunger alleviation program that the U.S. government operated in Brazil from 1942-1945. Through an in-depth study of agricultural education and hunger alleviation, I hope to participate in discussions about foreign aid and the geopolitical relationship between South and North America. While conducting research, I would enroll as a graduate student in history at the Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) in Rio de Janeiro. Paulo Fontes, a historian and professor at FGV, has offered to serve as my academic and research mentor. Over the course of nine months, I would complete two graduate courses and produce a manuscript of a journal article on my research. As a Fulbright scholar, I could develop an intellectual community and contribute valuable research to the field of history.”

PhD Alumnus Adam T. Rosenbaum on Mentoring the Senior Thesis in ‘Perspectives on History’

PhD alumnus (’11) Adam T. Rosenbaum published an article in the March edition of Perspectives on History, the newsmagazine of the American Historical Association. The publication, “Leading by Example: The Senior Thesis and the Teacher-Scholar,” charts Rosenbaum’s novel approach to teaching a seminar in which undergraduates write a capstone thesis. Rosenbaum was recently tenured at Colorado Mesa University and his book, Bavarian Tourism and the Modern World, 1800–1950was published by Cambridge UP in 2016. Check out an excerpt below and read the full piece in Perspectives here.

“As I prepared to teach the course a second time, I decided to make some changes. I rewrote the syllabus with a narrower focus on the history of the Third Reich, abandoning the topical flexibility of the first incarnation. I created a five-page bibliography of English-language sources related to that subject, providing students with a significant head start. Then I had another idea: I would write a thesis paper alongside my students, completing all the assignments along the way.”

Alumnus Adam Goldstein (’16) Publishes Article in ‘Atlanta Studies’

Former undergraduate and history major Adam Goldstein (’16) recently published a piece in Atlanta Studies. Based on his undergraduate honors thesis (completed under the direction of Joe Crespino), the piece focuses on the East Lake neighborhood in Atlanta and is titled “A Purposely Built Community: Public Housing Redevelopment and Resident Replacement at East Lake Meadows.” Goldstein is now a Bobby Jones Scholar at the University of St. Andrews, where he is studying affordable housing policy. Atlanta Studies is an open access, digital publication based at Emory’s Center for Digital Scholarship. Each piece undergoes review by a multi-institutional and -disciplinary editorial board. Read Goldstein’s full article.

Graduate Students Design and Teach Spring 2017 Courses

Three graduate students from the History Department are teaching courses this spring to Emory undergraduates. Professors Julia López Fuentes, Audrey Henderson, and Jennifer E. Morgan designed and developed original courses as a part of the Laney Graduate School’s TATTO program. This opportunity provides graduate students with valuable teaching experience and comprises part of the Department’s holistic training for future teachers and scholars.

Check out the syllabi for the Spring 2017 offerings below and browse the courses from Spring 2016, as well.

 

Four History Majors Named to 100 Senior Honorary from the Class of 2017

Congratulations to history majors Elana Cates, Mary Hollis McGreevy, Samantha Perlman, and Lindsay Petersohn, who were selected for induction into the 100 Senior Honorary Emory Class of 2017. This annual list comprises the most outstanding 100 seniors from Oxford College, Emory College, Goizueta Business School, and the School of Nursing. As explained by the 100 Senior Honorary website, selected students “are deeply committed to their beliefs, pursuits, or passions” and “have made outstanding contributions to Emory through academics, athletics, leadership, volunteerism, or even through personal relationships such as mentoring or helping other students.” Check out the full list of 2017 inductees here.