Daniel B. Domingues da Silva (PhD ’11), Molly McCullers (PhD, ’13), and Sean Andrew Wempe (PhD, ’15) Contribute to December Issue of ‘The American Historical Review’

Emory University PhD alumni are well represented in the December issue of The American Historical Review (AHR). Two alumni contribute to the reflections on “One Hundred Years of Mandates.” Molly McCullers (PhD, ’13) addresses the mandate system in South Africa in her article, “Betwixt and Between Colony and Nation-State: Liminality, Decolonization, and the South West Africa Mandate.” Sean Andrew Wempe (PhD, ’15) points out in which ways the mandate system preserved empires through his article, “A League to Preserve Empires: Understanding the Mandates System and Avenues for Further Scholarly Inquiry.” In the Museum Review section, Daniel B. Domingues da Silva (PhD, ’11) authored a piece on the “Museu do Aljube Resistência e Liberdade, Lisbon, Portugal.”

Elizabeth Stice (PhD, 2012) Describes Assigning One Text for the Entire Semester in “Inside Higher Ed”

Dr. Elizabeth Stice, a 2012 PhD alumna and Associate Professor at Palm Beach Atlantic University, recently authored an article in Inside Higher Ed on taking a different approach to assigned readings in her courses. In a humanities course that typically covers from 1700 through the present, Stice opted to use only one text for the entire semester: Tolstoy’s Anna KareninaRead about the mostly positive results of the experiment in Stice’s Inside Higher Ed article: “When Less Is More in the Classroom.” Stice completed her dissertation, “Empire Between the Lines: Constructions of Empire in British and French Trench Newspapers of the Great War,” under the advisement of Associate Professor of History Kathryn E. Amdur.

Harvard UP Publishes Sharon T. Strocchia’s ‘Forgotten Healers’

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In December of 2019 Harvard University Press released Professor Sharon T. Strocchia‘s newest book, Forgotten Healers: Women and the Pursuit of Health in Late Renaissance Italy.  The monograph recovers the pivotal roles that women played in providing health care in Renaissance Italy and, in doing so, uncovers their role in the transformation of early modern medicine and medical science. Sheila Barker, director at the Medici Archive Project, writes that Strocchia’s work “makes a vital contribution to the history of medicine, gender studies, and Renaissance studies.” Strocchia’s previous monographs were Death and Ritual in Renaissance Florence (Johns Hopkins UP, 1992) and Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence (Johns Hopkins UP, 2009), which was awarded the 2010 Marraro Prize by the American Catholic Historical Association. Read more about Forgotten Healers on the site for Harvard UP.

Emory News Center Features ‘Archival Lives’ Conference

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The Emory News Center featured a profile of the Archival Lives conference from December 5-7, 2019. Co-convened by Adriana Chira (History), Clifton Crais (African Studies/History), and Walter C. Rucker (African American Studies/History), the workshop brought together an array of participants “to reckon with what it means to work with and produce archives of the African diaspora.” Read April Hunt’s feature story on the Emory News Website, “‘Archival Lives’ conference examines trans-Atlantic slave trade,” in addition to the full description of the conference at “Archival Lives.”

Martin Pimentel, Senior History Major and Fox Fellow, Posts on Research About Detroit’s Rumor Control Center

Martin Pimentel, a senior double-majoring in history and political science, recently published a blog post for the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Pimentel is a Fox Center Undergraduate Humanities SIRE Fellow. He is completing his honors thesis, which examines the history of Detroit’s rumor control center in the 1960s. Read his recent post here: “Detrioters: The Rise and Fall of the Detroit Rumor Control Center, 1967-1970.”

Undergraduate Fox Center Fellow and History Major Daniel Thomas Publishes Blog Post About Honors Thesis

Daniel Thomas, a senior history and international studies double major, recently published a blog post about his honors thesis for Emory’s Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Thomas researches the history of Russian separatism in the Donbas, a region in Eastern Ukraine. He completed fieldwork for his thesis in the summer of 2019 in Kyiv, Ukraine, with support from the History Department’s George P. Cuttino Scholarship for Independent Study Abroad. Thomas is currently an undergraduate fellow at the Fox Center and works with Dr. Matthew Payne. Read his post here: “Neighbors against Neighbors: Historical roots of the Donbas War, 1985-2014.”

 

History Majors Coe and Fuller Win 2019 Elizabeth Long Atwood Undergraduate Research Awards

Annually Emory’s Woodruff Library recognizes outstanding research among undergraduates in the Emory College with the Elizabeth Long Atwood Undergraduate Research Awards. Eligible students must use the library’s collections and research resources in their original papers, digital projects, or posters and show evidence of critical analysis in their research skills.

Congratulations to two history majors who won this award for 2019. Ellie Coe (class of 2022), is a history and Russian & East European studies double major. She won for her project, “The Soldier’s Queue in the Eighteenth Century.” Hannah Fuller (class of 2020) is a history major and was recognized for her project, “Jemima Wilkinson: The Genderless Feminist of the Enlightenment.” Both Coe and Miller completed their research under the supervision of Dr. Judith A. Miller, Associate Professor of History.

Read more about the Atwood Awards, including former history students who have won the prize, here: The Elizabeth Long Atwood Undergraduate Research Award.