Yannakakis and Premo Win American Society for Legal History Article Prize

Congratulations to Dr. Yanna Yannakakis, 2018-2021 Winship Distinguished Research Professorship in History and Associate Professor, on winning an article prize with co-author Dr. Bianca Premo (Florida International University). The American Society for Legal History awarded their 2019 American Historical Review article, “A Court of Stick and Branches: Indian Jurisdiction in Colonial Mexico and Beyond,” with the Jane Burbank Article Prize. The prize is awarded annually to the best article in regional, global, imperial, comparative, or transnational legal history.

American Society for Ethnohistory Recognizes 2019 ‘AHR’ Article by Yannakakis and Premo

The American Society for Ethnohistory recognized an article co-written by Drs. Yanna Yannakakis and Bianca Premo (Florida International University) with honorable mention for the the Robert F. Heizer Award. The article, titled “A Court of Stick and Branches: Indian Jurisdiction in Colonial Mexico and Beyond,” was published in the February 2019 issue of the American Historical Review. Read more about the prize here.

Crespino in ‘The New York Times’: “What Democrats Are Up Against in Georgia”

Jimmy Carter Professor of History and History Department Chair Joseph Crespino published an opinion piece in The New York Times over the weekend. Titled “What Democrats Are Up Against in Georgia,” the article examines how Georgia’s distinctive political culture and history will shape the state’s two runoff elections for the U.S. Senate. Read an excerpt below along with the full piece.

“Mr. Trump’s delusional tweets declaring that he won the election or teasing new revelations of fraud and corruption evoke a similar sense of living in a dream world. The good news for Georgians is that on Jan. 5 they have an opportunity to send a wake-up call. Two Democratic victories would not only give Democrats control of the Senate but could also help turn the page on Donald Trump’s influence in American politics.”

Crespino Comments on Political Polarization and Everyday Life for the ‘AJC’

Dr. Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of History and Department Chair, was recently quoted in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution article “Divided Georgians resort to tiptoeing, avoidance, unfriending.” Written by Matt Kempner, Shelia Poole, and Andy Peters, the piece discusses contemporary political polarization in the state of Georgia, especially in the wake of the 2020 election. Crespino is an expert in the political and cultural history of the twentieth-century United States and of the U.S. South since Reconstruction. Read an excerpt from the article below along with the full piece here.

Today’s bitter partisanshipis boosted by what people are exposed to, from cable TV news sources to personalized advertising on Google and Facebook, driven by algorithms, said Emory University historian Joseph Crespino. “We don’t look at the same sources of information.”

Communities also are much less politically diverse than they used to be, Crespino said. People are surrounded by others who think like them.

“If you live in Decatur, you’ll have very little understanding of how people in the rest of Georgia could vote for Trump,” he said. “If you live in South Georgia, you can’t understand how people could vote for Biden.”

Anderson Quoted in ‘U.S. News and World Report’ Article: “Stacey Abrams’ Legacy: A Democratic South?”

The 2020 election saw a majority of Georgians vote for a democrat for president for the first time since 1992. Dr. Carol Anderson, Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies and Associated Faculty in the History Department, analyzed the years of grassroots organizing and coalition building that led toward this shift in a recent U.S. News & World Report article. Anderson discusses Stacey Abrams’ role in turning Georgia blue along with the prospect that other states in the U.S. South may see similar shifts in future elections. Read an excerpt below along with the full piece: “Stacey Abrams’ Legacy: A Democratic South?

“What we have here in Georgia is incredible grassroots mobilization and organizing,” says Anderson, chair of Emory’s African American studies department and author of “One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy.” Abrams may have had a high profile, Anderson says, but an army of behind-the-scenes workers were just as invaluable, and the coalition they built included advocacy groups for Asian Americans and Latinos.

“They’ve been doing the work for years, and I mean years,” Anderson says. “Not just two years or three years. I mean, years,” including a decade for Abrams, who started when she was in the Georgia General Assembly – “and it is long, hard work. That is not glamorous. It takes long, hard, sustained effort.”

Lipstadt Joins ADL in Condemning Yad Vashem Post

Deborah E. Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies and Associated Faculty in the History Department, was recently quoted in an article in The Atlanta Jewish Times. The piece discusses Lipstadt’s opposition to the controversial nomination of former far-right politician and military commander Effi Eitam to head Yad Vashem, Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Shoah or Holocaust. Read the excerpt below along with the full article: “ADL and Lipstadt Condemn Yad Vashem Post.”

“Yad Vashem is one of the jewels in the crown of Israeli institutions,” said Deborah Lipstadt, Emory University Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish History and Holocaust Studies. She said that, given Eitam’s “fringe views, views that separate and divide rather than unite,” his nomination is a “colossal mistake.” She told the AJT that she plans to voice her opposition to the controversial nomination.

Anderson Pens Op-Ed in ‘The Guardian’: “Democracy won’t die on our watch”

Dr. Carol Anderson, Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies and Associated Faculty in the History Department, has published an opinion editorial in The Guardian. Titled “Millions of Americans have risen up and said: democracy won’t die on our watch,” the piece outlines how U.S. citizens responded to efforts at voter suppression by casting an unprecedented number of ballots in the 2020 elections. Read an excerpt below along with the full article: “Millions of Americans have risen up and said: democracy won’t die on our watch.”

While the forces arrayed against the United States looked formidable, they were not invincible. Instead, they ran into something that is even more powerful than a president, a senate, or the US supreme court. The American people themselves and their belief in and devotion to democracy.

Armstrong-Partida’s ‘Women and Community in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia’ Wins Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender

Dr. Michelle Armstrong-Partida, Associate Professor of History, published Women and Community in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (University of Nebraska Press, 2020) with co-editors Alexandra Guerson (University of Toronto) and Dana Wessell Lightfoot (University of Northern British Columbia). Congratulations to Armstrong-Partida and her co-editors on winning the 2020 Collaborative Project Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender. Read more about the volume and prize in the award citation below:

The awards committee praised the book for interrogating the very idea of what constitutes community, and demonstrating that examining women’s roles and activities beyond the family changes our understanding of gender and social networks. Rather than treating community as self-evident or static, the contributors “explore the multi-varied and interwoven networks that women of different religious, socioeconomic, and geographic regions were embedded within.” While the deeply researched and well-written individual chapters address communities of Jewish women, conversas, Moriscas, nuns, and widows, the volume ranges beyond these groups to include women whose communities were not defined by religion or in relation to men: victims of clerical violence; perpetrators of neighborhood feuds; recipients of charitable support; and writers of wills. The volume amply fulfills its goal of “more clearly see[ing] women’s ability to navigate a multiplicity of identities and roles—and moves beyond the traditional approach of studying women within the confines of their families.” By treating community as a category of analysis, it reframes our understanding of the roles of women in medieval and early modern society. 

Strocchia’s ‘Gender, Health and Healing 1250-1550’ Wins Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender

Congratulations to Dr. Sharon T. Strocchia, Professor of History, whose co-edited volume Gender, Health and Healing 1250-1550 (Amsterdam, 2020) has won the 2020 Collaborative Project Award from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender. Strocchia edited the volume with Dr. Sara Ritchey, Associate Professor in the history department at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. Read more about the innovative volume in the prize citation below:

The awards committee stated that the book is exciting in conception and breadth, using “an integrative, hybrid model of analysis” that ranges far beyond “the narrow terrain of academic, text-based medicine” using new types of evidence about women’s “acts of caring and curing.” In eleven tightly argued and evidentially rich essays on engaging topics (including Ottoman healing baths, Caterina Sforza’s famous Ricettaria, and the care of the breast, among others) contributors manage to fulfill the promise of the Introduction: “to reimagine the lived experience of healthcare beyond the limited sphere of scholastic or theoretical medicine,” using non-traditional materials drawn from Christian and Islamic worlds to provide “a more nuanced picture of what people actually did to sustain or recover good health and the ways in which they understood their own bodies.” 

Anderson Analyzes 2020 Election for ‘Democracy Now’ and ‘The New York Times’

In the lead up to and shortly following the 2020 election, Dr. Carol Anderson contributed political analysis and historical context to two major media organizations. Four days before the election, Anderson was a guest on the Democracy Now segment, “‘Fighting for Democracy’: Carol Anderson on Voter Suppression & Why Georgia Could Go Blue.” Her prediction that Georgians may vote for a democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992 seems likely to come true. Three days following the election, while officials in Georgia and other battleground states continued to count votes, Anderson offered historical context for The New York Times on the links between U.S. slavery and the Electoral College. Read an excerpt from that article below along with the full piece: “The Electoral College Is Close. The Popular Vote Isn’t.” Anderson is Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies and Associated Faculty in the History Department.

“We look at a map of so-called red and blue states and treat that map as land and not people,” said Carol Anderson, a professor of African-American studies at Emory University who researches voter suppression. “Why, when somebody has won millions more votes than their opponent, are we still deliberating over 10,000 votes here, 5,000 votes there?”