Dr. Stefanie M. Woodard (PhD ’19) Wins Essay Prize from NC German Studies Seminar and Workshop Series

Congratulations to Dr. Stefanie M. Woodard (PhD ’19). Her article manuscript “Ethnic German ‘Resettlers’ from Poland and their Integration into Western Germany, 1970-1990” won the inaugural Konrad H. Jarausch Essay Prize for Advanced Graduate Students in Central European History from the North Carolina German Studies Seminar and Workshop Series (NCGS). The jury selected Dr. Woodard’s work because it “married archival rigor and theoretical sophistication.” Read more about the prize here.

Claudia Kreklau (PhD ’18) Wins Parker-Schmitt Dissertation Award from the Southern Historical Association

Congratulations for Dr. Claudia Kreklau for winning the Parker-Schmitt Dissertation Award from the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association. Kreklau completed her dissertation, entitled “‘Eat as the King Eats’: Making the Middle Class through Food, Foodways, and Food Discourses in Nineteenth-Century Germany,” in 2018. The dissertation was advised by Drs. Brian Vick, Sander Gilman, and Dawn Peterson. Kreklau is currently Associate Lecturer in Modern European History at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. 

 

Sean Andrew Wempe (PhD, 2015) Publishes ‘Revenants of the German Empire’ with Oxford UP

In June of 2019 Oxford University Press will publish the first book of Sean Andrew Wempe, a 2015 doctoral program alumnus. Wempe’s monograph is entitled Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations. Benedikt Stuchtey, Professor at Philipps-University Marburg, Germany, describes Revenants as a “timely and meticulously researched book based on a wide array of archival material.” Wempe is currently Assistant Professor of Modern European History at California State University–Bakersfield. Read the publisher’s description of the book below.

In 1919 the Treaty of Versailles stripped Germany of its overseas colonies. This sudden transition to a post-colonial nation left the men and women invested in German imperialism to rebuild their status on the international stage. Remnants of an earlier era, these Kolonialdeutsche (Colonial Germans) exploited any opportunities they could to recover, renovate, and market their understandings of German and European colonial aims in order to reestablish themselves as “experts” and “fellow civilizers” in discourses on nationalism and imperialism.

Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations tracks the difficulties this diverse group of Colonial Germans encountered while they adjusted to their new circumstances, as repatriates to Weimar Germany or as subjects of the War’s victors in the new African Mandates. Faced with novel systems of international law, Colonial Germans re-situated their notions of imperial power and group identity to fit in a world of colonial empires that were not their own. The book examines how former colonial officials, settlers, and colonial lobbies made use of the League of Nations framework to influence diplomatic flashpoints including the Naturalization Controversy in Southwest Africa, the Locarno Conference, and the Permanent Mandates Commission from 1927-1933.

Sean Wempe revises standard historical portrayals of the League of Nations’ form of international governance, German participation in the League, the role of interest groups in international organizations and diplomacy, and liberal imperialism. In analyzing Colonial German investment and participation in interwar liberal internationalism, the project challenges the idea of a direct continuity between Germany’s colonial period and the Nazi era.

Former History Major Samantha Perlman (17C) Runs for City Council in Marlborough, MA

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Former Emory history major Samantha Perlman has launched an at-large bid for city council in her hometown of Marlborough, MA. Perlman completed a double major in History and African-American Studies and earned History Honors with a thesis entitled “When Admission Is Not Enough: Integrating Emory University, 1969-1989.” Read more about her campaign at http://www.samanthaperlman.org.

Debjani Bhattacharyya’s ‘Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta’ Featured in ‘The New York Review of Books’

Dr. Debjani Bhattacharyya, Assistant Professor of History at Drexel University and a 2014 graduate of Emory’s PhD program, published Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta: The Making of Calcutta with Cambridge University Press in 2018. Maya Jasanoff, the Coolidge Professor of History at Harvard University, recently featured Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta in an article in The New York Review of Books. Bhattacharyya was advised by Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History Jeffrey Lesser. Read an excerpt of Jasanoff’s review below along with the full article, “Lost Calcutta.”

“In her innovative new book, Empire and Ecology in the Bengal Delta, Debjani Bhattacharyya, a professor of history at Drexel University, describes how Bengalis had their own story about Calcutta’s origins. “Legend has it that the city was born when the ocean started churning, and a tortoise,” pressed between the mountains and the force of Ananta, the infinite, “gasped out a deep breath.” Its breath made the Bengal Delta, a vast 40,000-square-mile area where the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers seep into the Bay of Bengal. This legend, like the legend of Job Charnock, also carries an element of truth: Calcutta rests on shifting ground. It should be no surprise that its fortunes have shifted too.”

Lena Oak Suk (PhD, ’14) and Andrew G. Britt (PhD, ’18) Receive Prizes from the Latin American Studies Association

The Brazil section of the Latin American Studies Association recently awarded prizes to Dr. Lena Oak Suk and Dr. Andrew G. Britt, both historians of Brazil and alumni of the Emory History Department. Suk, who was advised by Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History Jeffrey Lesser, is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. She received Honorable Mention in the Best Article in the Humanities category her piece: “‘Only the Fragile Sex Admitted’: The Women’s Restaurant in 1920s São Paulo, Brazil,” Journal of Social History 51:3 (Spring 2018). Britt, who is currently Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at Northwestern University, received Honorable Mention in the Best Dissertation in the Humanities category for his work, “‘I’ll Samba Someplace Else’: Constructing Neighborhood and Identity in São Paulo, 1930s-1980s.” Britt was co-advised by Lesser and Thomas D. Rogers, Associate Professor of Modern Latin American History and NEH/Arthur Blank Distinguished Teaching Professor (2018-2021).

Natália Salgado Bueno, Assistant Professor in Emory’s Department of Political Science, also received an Honorable Mention in the Best Article in the Social Sciences category for:  “Bypassing the Enemy: Distributive Politics, Credit Claiming, and Nonstate Organizations in Brazil,” Comparative Political Studies 51:3 (Mar. 2018), pp. 304–340.