Jeffrey Lesser Surveys Rising Evangelical Influence in Brazilian Society and Politics

Dr. Jeffrey Lesser, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History and Director of the Halle Institute for Global Research and Learning, discussed the increasing influence of evangelicals in Brazilian society and politics for Bloomberg. The article was released three days before the first round of Brazil’s 2018 elections. The October 7 elections included the near-victory of Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right candidate with substantial evangelical support. Read the full piece, written by R.T. Watson, David Biller, and Samy Adghirni, here: “From Jails to Congress, Brazil’s Evangelicals Could Swing Election.”

Dr. Danielle Wiggins (PhD, 2018) on Black Progressives and the Democratic Party in ‘The Washington Post’

Recent doctoral program graduate Danielle Wiggins (PhD, 2018) authored an article in The Washington Post. Wiggins’ piece examines how Rev. Jesse Jackson’s 1980s presidential campaigns laid the groundwork for contemporary black progressives in the Democratic party. Wiggins is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Jefferson Scholars Foundation at the University of Virginia. Read the article here: “The black progressives remaking the Democratic Party.”

Emory History Department Well Represented at Decatur Book Festival

Emory History Department faculty, alumni, and current students are among the presenting authors at this year’s AJC Decatur Book Festival, the largest independent book festival in the country. 2018 marks the first year that Emory University is a presenting sponsor. See the presentations of authors associated with the History Department below, and explore the full schedule here.

  • Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of History and History Department Chair. “Atticus Finch: A Biography.” Sept. 2, 3:45-4:30 p.m., Decatur Presbyterian Sanctuary.
  • Ruby Lal, Professor of South Asian History, Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies and Associated Faculty in History. “Empress: The Astonishing Reign of Nur Jahan.” Sept. 1, 3-3:45 p.m., Marriott Conference Center B.
  • Hank Klibanoff, Professor of Practice, Creative Writing. “Understanding our Painful Past: Investigating the Impact of Lynchings Through Voice and Prose.” Sept. 1, 5:30-6:15 p.m., Decatur Presbyterian Sanctuary.
  • Edward Hatfield, Managing Editor of the “New Georgia Encyclopedia.” Hatfield will introduce Joseph Crespino. Sept. 2, 3:45-4:30 p.m., Decatur Presbyterian Sanctuary.
  • Michelle Oppong-Ampofo, Poet, Emory College Junior, and History Department Work-Study Student. Oppong-Ampofo will read her poetry on Sunday, Sept. 2, 4:40-6 p.m.

Carol Anderson in ‘The New York Times’: “Brian Kemp, Enemy of Democracy”

Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies Carol Anderson recently authored an opinion piece in The New York Times. Anderson discusses the record of voter suppression by Brian Kemp, Georgia’s secretary of state since 2010 and currently the Republican nominee for governor. Read the full article: “Brian Kemp, Enemy of Democracy: An expert on voter suppression, he will help keep Georgia red.”

Graduate Students Alexander Cors and Shari Wejsa Publish Blog Entries for HASTAC

Second-year graduate students Alexander Cors and Shari Wejsa are the two 2017-18 HASTAC Scholars at Emory’s Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Cors and Wejsa recently published entries on the blog of HASTAC, which stands for the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory. Check out links to their recent posts and read their HASTAC biographies below.

Alexander Cors

My research interests broadly encompass transatlantic history in the early modern period, from 1450 to 1850. Geographically, my focus is on Latin America and Europe. I am particularly interested in colonial Louisiana, the circum-Caribbean, and Bourbon Spain.

My current project investigates migration and settlement patterns, immigration policies, and discourses on foreigners in eighteenth-century Louisiana. I am particularly concerned with questions of ethnicity, integration, and identity in the early modern transatlantic empires of France and Spain. I am also interested in Digital Humanities, especially the use of GIS technology to create ethnolinguistic maps of the eighteenth-century Mississippi Valley.

Shari Wejsa 

As a PhD student in Latin American history, I study the experiences of Angolan and Mozambican immigrants and refugees in Brazil in the postcolonial period. I examine how their migratory experiences have shaped their identities as they adapted to Brazil while remaining connected to their countries of origin. I also explore how international human rights law and evolving immigration policies have affected the lives of these migrants. My research interests are an extension of my Fulbright Commission-sponsored work on Brazil’s National Truth Commission, which investigated the human rights violations committed during Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964-1985), and the inequities of educational access for Afro-Brazilian girls and women in Bahia. As an educator, I seek to cultivate critical thinking on issues of human rights and social justice while advocating for active engagement as transformative power.

Lesser on Ancestry and DNA Testing in ‘The Atlanta Journal Constitution”

History Department Chair Jeffrey Lesser recently commented on the expanding use of DNA tests to chart an individuals’ ancestry in The Atlanta Journal Constitution. The article, titled “Do popular DNA tests like 23andMe, Ancestry actually work?” explores the motivations for taking these tests and the results they provide. Lesser, a specialist in immigration and ethnicity, asserted that “There are lots of different ways of understanding heritage. I think as historians, we’re interested in why people believe what they do, which is quite different than saying that people are something.” Read the full article here.

Crespino in ‘The Wall Street Journal’: “Who Is the Real Atticus Finch?”

Dr. Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of History, wrote an article for The Wall Street Journal entitled “Who is the Real Atticus Finch?” The piece explores competing interpretations of Harper Lee’s protagonist as a champion of justice or racist in the context of an adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird on Broadway. Crespino is the author of  Atticus Finch: The Biography — Harper Lee, Her Father, and the Making of an American Icon (Basic Books, 2018).  Read the full piece (paywall protected) here.