Ben Nobbs-Thiessen (PhD 2016) Wins Dissertation Award

Congratulations to Dr. Ben Nobbs-Thiessen for winning the 2016 Gilbert C. Fite Award for the best dissertation on agricultural history from the Agricultural History Society. He completed his dissertation, “The Cultivated State, Migrants and the Transformation of the Bolivian Lowlands, 1952-2000,” in 2016 under the advisement of Drs. Jeffrey Lesser, Peter Little, Thomas D. Rogers, and Yanna Yannakakis. Read the below for a more detailed explanation of Nobbs-Thiessen’s research:

My research explores the role of migrants in the “March to the East” a large-scale settlement and rural development initiative undertaken by the Bolivian state after 1952.  Over half a century hundreds of thousands of settlers arrived in the tropical Department of Santa Cruz in Bolivia’s Eastern Lowlands to begin new lives as frontier farmers.  Among the migrants were indigenous Bolivians from the nation’s highlands, low-German speaking Mennonites from Canada, Paraguay and Mexico as well as groups of Japanese and Okinawan colonists that had been re-settled with support from the Japanese government and the U.S. military.  Together these diverse streams made the March to the East a uniquely transnational affair and a compelling case study for understanding migration and mid-century rural modernization.

Alumni Update: Dr. Glen Goodman (PhD, 2015) Wins Fulbright and German Academic Exchange Service Grants

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The History Department sends its congratulations to Emory alumnus Glen Goodman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Goodman won a Fulbright grant to teach in the graduate program in History at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, located in Porto Alegre, during the spring semester 2018. In addition, the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) awarded Goodman a research grant to conduct archival work in Berlin during the summer of 2017. Goodman was an advisee of Dr. Jeffrey Lesser, Department Chair and Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History.

Dr. Carol Anderson Wins National Book Critics Circle Award

Media of White Rage

Congratulations to Dr. Carol Anderson, Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies and a member of the History Department graduate faculty, for winning the Criticism Award from the National Book Critics Circle (NBCC). The NBCC awarded Anderson’s White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide (Bloomsbury, 2016). Read more about the prize, including the other winning books from this year, here.

Senior Hugh McGlade Wins Fulbright Research Grant

Congratulations to senior History major Hugh McGlade, who received a grant from the U.S. State Department’s Fulbright program for research in Brazil. The grant provides funding for one year of academic study and research. McGlade will live in Rio de Janeiro for nine months and enroll as a graduate student at the Fundação Getúlio Vargas. In parallel, he will expand his research on U.S.-Brazilian hunger alleviation programs in the 1940s, a subject he previously studied in his honors thesis. Read an excerpt of McGlade’s project description below:

“My research project would examine a hunger alleviation program that the U.S. government operated in Brazil from 1942-1945. Through an in-depth study of agricultural education and hunger alleviation, I hope to participate in discussions about foreign aid and the geopolitical relationship between South and North America. While conducting research, I would enroll as a graduate student in history at the Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) in Rio de Janeiro. Paulo Fontes, a historian and professor at FGV, has offered to serve as my academic and research mentor. Over the course of nine months, I would complete two graduate courses and produce a manuscript of a journal article on my research. As a Fulbright scholar, I could develop an intellectual community and contribute valuable research to the field of history.”

Four History Majors Named to 100 Senior Honorary from the Class of 2017

Congratulations to history majors Elana Cates, Mary Hollis McGreevy, Samantha Perlman, and Lindsay Petersohn, who were selected for induction into the 100 Senior Honorary Emory Class of 2017. This annual list comprises the most outstanding 100 seniors from Oxford College, Emory College, Goizueta Business School, and the School of Nursing. As explained by the 100 Senior Honorary website, selected students “are deeply committed to their beliefs, pursuits, or passions” and “have made outstanding contributions to Emory through academics, athletics, leadership, volunteerism, or even through personal relationships such as mentoring or helping other students.” Check out the full list of 2017 inductees here.

History Honors Students McGlade and Perlman Receive FCHI Fellowships

Congratulations to History Honors students Hugh McGlade and Samantha Perlman, who have received Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry (FCHI) Undergraduate Humanities Honors Fellowships for Spring 2017. The fellowship receives support from the Emory College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program and aids students completing honors projects for one semester. Along with office space at the FCHI and fellowship resources, recipients participate in a dynamic community of cross-generational scholars. Learn more about the FCHI fellowships and check out the brief profiles of McGlade and Perlman below.

Hugh

Hugh McGlade is majoring in History and International Studies. He focuses on Latin America, especially Brazil, and is a student of Portuguese. His thesis investigates a hunger alleviation program in Brazil during the early 1940s, exploring questions of capitalism, politics, and cultural exchange.
 
Samantha
Samantha Perlman is double majoring in History and African American Studies. Her honors thesis stems from her experience witnessing student protest movements while abroad in South Africa, as well as her interest in American educational reform. Her thesis examines the history of affirmative action at Emory College from 1969 to 1989.  By uncovering the story of affirmative action at Emory, her project provides historical context for how Emory can address systemic problems of underrepresentation and promote a more inclusive campus climate.