Allen Tullos in ‘Fortune’: “Roy Moore Makes Ted Cruz Look Like a Democrat”

Professor of History Allen Tullos recently published an article in Fortune, titled “Roy Moore Makes Ted Cruz Look Like a Democrat.” The piece addresses Alabama’s recent Republican primary and the victory of Roy Moore over Luther Strange. Tullos, who is editor of Southern Spaces and Co-Director of Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, authored Alabama Getaway: The Political Imaginary and the Heart of Dixie (Athens: UGA Press, 2011).

Roxani Margariti, MESAS Associate Professor and Associated Faculty in the History Department, Wins Greek Diaspora Fellowship

Congratulations to Roxani Margariti, Associate Professor in Middle Eastern Studies and Associated Faculty in the History Department, for winning a Greek Diaspora Fellowship. Margariti will teach a graduate seminar at the University of Crete, titled “From Muhammad to the Mamluks: Medieval Middle Eastern and Islamic History and Historiography.” Read the Emory News Center’s story about Margariti’s course, and learn more about the Greek Diaspora Fellowship Program.

Department Co-Sponsors Symposium, “Between the Ivory Tower and the Prison: Recent Public Scholarship on Mass Incarceration”

The History Department is co-sponsoring a symposium on Emory’s campus September 28-29. The event features Daniel LaChance, Assistant Professor of History, along with scholars from other universities nationwide. Join for any or all sessions.

September 28

23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement

  • Featuring Keramet Reiter (Dept. of Criminology, Law and Society – University of California – Irvine)
  • 10am – 12pm
  • School of Medicine, Room 178P

The Art/Crime Archive

  • Paul Kaplan (School of Public Affairs – San Diego State University)
  • 2pm – 4pm
  • School of Medicine, Room 178P

Film Screening and Discussion: The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

  • Featuring Brett Story (documentary filmmaker; Visiting Fellow, Center for Media, Culture and History – New York University)
  • 5pm – 7:30pm
  • Rita Anne Rollins Building, Room 252

September 29

 Preparing for a Career as a Public Intellectual: A Panel Discussion

 

Dr. Ernest Freeberg (Ph.D., 1995) to Present at National Archives at Atlanta

Ph.D. alumnus Ernest Freeberg (1995) will return to Atlanta on September 16 to present at a symposium, The Great War Over Here: Stories from the Home Front, held at the National Archives at Atlanta. Freeberg is Department Head and Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and the author of Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent (Harvard UP, 2010). View more details about the event here.

Dr. Kristin Mann Wins Distinguished Scholar Award

Congratulations to Dr. Kristin Mann, Professor of History, for winning the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Lagos Studies Association. Mann’s book publications about Lagos include  Marrying Well: Marriage, Status and Social Change among the Educated Elite in Colonial Lagos (Cambridge UP, 1985) and Slavery and the Birth of an African History: Lagos, 1760-1900 (Indiana UP, 2007). Read a more complete description of Mann’s scholarship and service to the discipline, written by Dr. Jessica Reuther (Ph.D., 2016), here.

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Courses Taught by Crespino and Sasson Highlighted by Emory News Center

Two History Department courses made the list of 19 notable offerings for Emory’s undergraduates this fall. Professor Joseph Crespino, Jimmy Carter Professor of American History, will teach a seminar course titled “Atticus Finch and American History.” Professor Tehlia Sasson, Assistant Professor of History, is offering “Origins of Human Rights.” Read the course descriptions below, and check out other compelling fall 2017 offerings around campus here.

Atticus Finch and American History

“Since its publication in 1960, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird has been one of the most widely read books in the world. The recent publication of Lee’s apprentice novel, Go Set A Watchman has renewed interest in the figure of Atticus Finch and the historical and cultural sources that influenced Lee. This seminar examines the history of the American South in the Jim Crow era that prefigured both the idealized Atticus of Mockingbird and the reactionary Atticus of Watchman. The class will analyze the political uses to which this character has been put since Mockingbird’s publication.”

Origins of Human Rights 

“This course recovers the multiple histories of human rights from their deep origins in the 1750s to their more recent formations in the 1990s. It focuses on the history of Europe and its engagement with the wider world: looking at how Europe has shaped and was shaped by Africa, South Asia and the United States over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. The goal will be to analyze how the evolution of human rights became part of our contemporary framework of politics, law and culture.”