Yannakakis and Rogers Honored with Named Chair Professorships

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Congratulations to Dr. Yanna Yannakakis and Dr. Thomas D. Rogers for receiving named chair professorships. Associate Professor of History and a specialist in colonial Mexico, Yannakakis received the Winship Distinguished Research Professorship in History for the 2018-2021 term. Rogers is Associate Professor of Modern Latin American History and will serve as the NEH/Arthur Blank Distinguished Teaching Professor for the same period. Read more about these named chairs below, and view others available to Emory Faculty here.

The Winship Distinguished Research Award is given to tenured faculty who demonstrate singular accomplishments in research. Such recognition should honor achievement and further scholarly research and research-based teaching. Awarded for a three-year term.

The Arthur Blank/NEH Chair in the Humanities and Humanistic Social Sciences is given to tenured faculty in the humanities and/or humanistic social sciences with a record of exemplary teaching and a commitment to pedagogical rigor and innovation. Appointees are expected to organize programming designed to enhance pedagogy and curricular development in the College, and continue teaching in her/his department(s), including at least one introductory level course each year. One leadership function of the NEH professors will be to serve on a newly formed advisory committee on Pedagogy and Curriculum. Awarded for a three-year term.

 

Rogers’ “A History of Hunger” Featured as Innovative Course for Spring 2018

The Emory News Center recently highlighted the Spring 2018 History Department course “A History of Hunger” as innovative. The course is designed and taught by History faculty member Tom Rogers. Rogers is Associate Professor of Modern Latin American History and is currently working a book project titled Agriculture’s Energy: Development and Hunger During Brazil’s Ethanol Boom. “A History of Hunger” was one of 16 “cool” courses identified by the News Center and offered at undergraduate and/or graduate levels this Spring. Read more about this course and the other compelling offerings here.

Allen Tullos on Alabama’s Special Senate Election in ‘El País’ (Spain)

Professor of History Allen Tullos recently commented on the special senate election in Alabama for an article in Spain’s largest newspaper, El País. Tullos, who also serves as the Senior Editor of Southern Spaces and Co-Director of the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, is the author of Alabama Getaway: The Political Imaginary and the Heart of Dixie (University of Georgia Press, 2012). Amanda Mars authored the piece, “Por qué el viejo sur dio la espalda a los republicanos.” See the excerpt below and read the full article.

“Alabama arrastra una larga y vergonzosa historia de falta de apoyo a la educación pública que resulta en una postura reaccionaria y desinformada a las políticas de raza, de género o de bienestar social y, por supuesto, persiste un racismo blanco que cae muy fácilmente en la demagogia de políticos como George Wallace, Donald Trump o Roy Moore”, afirma Allen Tullos, historiador de la Universidad de Emory. 

Innovative Teaching and Learning in Crespino’s “History 385: Right-Wing America” Culminates in “Documenting the Right” Student Film Festival

Students in Dr. Joseph Crespino‘s fall 2017 class, “History 385: Right-Wing America,” produced short documentary films that were screened on November 29 at the “Documenting the Right” Student Film Festival. Students took advantage of Emory’s rich library holdings in crafting videos whose themes ranged from racism in the career of George Wallace to Atlanta’s motto as the “city too busy to hate.” Read more about the project on the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship Blog: “Emory history class uses digital storytelling to study political movements.”

President Jimmy Carter Visits Dr. Tehila Sasson’s “Origins of Human Rights”

President Jimmy Carter recently visited Prof. Tehila Sasson’s class, “Origins of Human Rights.” The students engaged the President on foreign policy, civil rights, decolonization, the Camp David Accords, and the Cold War. President Carter answered questions ranging from the hostage crisis in Iran, women’s rights, North Korea, to human rights in the age of Trump.